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Surgical Services

Anesthesia Services are provided in a safe and sanitary environment by qualified health care practitioners who have been granted privileges to provide those services by the governing body.

The following definitions are used to describe the level of anesthesia and sedation administered:

  • Local or topical anesthesia is the application of local anesthetic agents, in appropriate doses adjusted for weight.
  • Minimal sedation (Anxiolysis) is a drug-induced state during which patients respond normally to verbal commands. Although cognitive function and coordination may be impaired, ventilatory and cardiovascular functions are unaffected. Inhaled nitrous oxide in low concentrations that would not reasonably be expected to result in loss of the patient’s life-preserving protective reflexes would be considered minimal sedation.
  • Moderate sedation/analgesia (conscious sedation) is a drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway, and spontaneous ventilation is adequate. Cardiovascular function is usually maintained.
  • Regional anesthesia is the application of anesthetic medication around the nerve or nerves in a major region of the body, which supply the area which is targeted for the abolition of painful neural impulses. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway, and spontaneous ventilation is adequate. Cardiovascular function is usually maintained.
  • Deep sedation/analgesia is a drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients cannot be easily aroused but respond purposefully following repeated or painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function may be impaired. Patients may require assistance in maintaining a patient airway, and spontaneous ventilation may be inadequate. Cardiovascular function is usually maintained.
  • General Anesthesia is a drug-induced loss of consciousness during which patients are not arousable, even by painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function is often impaired. Patients often require assistance in maintaining a patient airway, and positive pressure ventilation may be required because of depressed spontaneous ventilation or drug-induced depression of neuromuscular function. Cardiovascular function may be impaired.